Classic Collision Atlanta is Owned by a Parasite #42

Posted on 01. Apr, 2017 by in Classic Collision Atlanta

7/22/12

I continue to do research on all of the topics that I feel may help me to understand what has happened to me…in this situation and in all of the other situations in my life. The term parasite is one, among many of the terms, that seems to fit what I would best describe the kind of men that I attract.

I don’t understand, these men look like men, dress like men, talk/walk/act like men. Aah, I see…we must remember our last term, deceive.

How long does one person have to spend around another to figure out that they are not who they say they are. Are we supposed to walk around assuming that all people are pretending. Maybe most people don’t like what comes out of my mouth…but, with me, what you see is what you get! At least no can say that I didn’t warn them!

IF YOU CANNOT HANDLE MY SKELETONS FROM THE PAST…YOU DONT DESERVE THAT PACKAGE IN FRONT OF YOU…AND YOU ARE ONLY INTERSTED IN MY SURFACE…THEN THAT MEANS THAT YOU ARE USING ME TO MAKE YOURSELF LOOK/FEEL GOOD. IS FEEDING OFF OF OTHERS REALLY WORTH IT? I DO KNOW THIS, THERE IS A PRICE TO PAY FOR USERY AND IM TAPPED OUT. I THINK I’D RATHER JUST TRY TO BE A GOOD PERSON AND FIND THOSE WHO ARE GOOD PEOPLE TOO.

PARASITES ARE OUT FOR ONE THING AND ONE THING ONLY…WHAT THEY CAN GET OUT OF YOU.

Manfred Kammerer, you have taught me what the word parasite truly means. I do not like to think that there are people in this world that are only out for themselves….what a sad existence. You are the biggest user I have ever met and even though I was a victim due to my past…a past that almost lead me to believe that I deserved nothing better that to be taken advantage of by parasites, such as yourself…I was wrong. No one deserves what happened to me.

Feel free to learn something about yourself….

Parasitism

is a type of non mutual relationship between organisms of different species where one organism, the parasite, benefits at the expense of the other, the host. Traditionally parasite referred to organisms with life stages that needed more than one host (e.g. Taenia solium). These are now called macroparasites (typically protozoa and helminths). The word parasite now also refers to microparasites, which are typically smaller, such as viruses and bacteria, and can be directly transmitted between hosts of the same species. Examples of parasites include the plants mistletoe and cuscuta, and organisms such as leeches.

Unlike predators, parasites are generally much smaller than their host; both are special cases of consumer-resource interactions. Parasites show a high degree of specialization, and reproduce at a faster rate than their hosts. Classic examples of parasitism include interactions between vertebrate hosts and diverse animals such as tapeworms, flukes, the Plasmodium species, and fleas.

Parasitism is differentiated from the parasitoid relationship, though not sharply, by the fact that parasitoids generally kill or sterilize their hosts. Parasitoidism occurs in much the same variety of organisms that parasitism does.

The harm and benefit in parasitic interactions concern the biological fitness of the organisms involved. Parasites reduce host fitness in many ways, ranging from general or specialized pathology, such as parasitic castration and impairment of secondary sex characteristics, to the modification of host behavior. Parasites increase their fitness by exploiting hosts for resources necessary for the parasite’s survival, e.g. food, water, heat, habitat, and genetic dispersion.

Although the concept of parasitism applies unambiguously to many cases in nature, it is best considered part of a continuum of types of interactions between species, rather than an exclusive category. Particular interactions between species may satisfy some but not all parts of the definition. In many cases, it is difficult to demonstrate that the host is harmed. In others, there may be no apparent specialization on the part of the parasite, or the interaction between the organisms may be short-lived.

Types

Parasites are classified based on their interactions with their hosts and on their life cycles.

Parasites that live on the surface of the host are called ectoparasites (e.g. some mites). Those that live inside the host are called endoparasites (including all parasitic worms). Endoparasites can exist in one of two forms: intercellular parasites (inhabiting spaces in the host’s body) or intracellular parasites (inhabiting cells in the host’s body). Intracellular parasites, such as protozoa, bacteria or viruses, tend to rely on a third organism, which is generally known as the carrier or vector.[citation needed] The vector does the job of transmitting them to the host. An example of this interaction is the transmission of malaria, caused by a protozoan of the genus Plasmodium, to humans by the bite of an anopheline mosquito. Those parasites living in an intermediate position, being half-ectoparasites and half-endoparasites, are sometimes called mesoparasite.

An epiparasite is one that feeds on another parasite. This relationship is also sometimes referred to as hyperparasitism, exemplified by a protozoan (the hyperparasite) living in the digestive tract of a flea living on a dog.

Social parasites

take advantage of interactions between members of social organisms such as ants or termites. In kleptoparasitism, parasites appropriate food gathered by the host. An example is the brood parasitism practiced by many species of cuckoo and cowbird, which do not build nests of their own but rather deposit their eggs in nests of other species and abandon them there. The host behaves as a “babysitter” as they raise the young as their own. If the host removes the cuckoo’s eggs, some cuckoos will return and attack the nest to compel host birds to remain subject to this parasitism. The cowbird’s parasitism does not necessarily harm its host’s brood; however, the cuckoo may remove one or more host eggs to avoid detection, and furthermore the young cuckoo may heave the host’s eggs and nestlings out of the nest.

Parasitism can take the form of isolated cheating or exploitation among more generalized mutualistic interactions. For example, broad classes of plants and fungi exchange carbon and nutrients in common mutualistic mycorrhizal relationships; however, some plant species known as myco-heterotrophs “cheat” by taking carbon from a fungus rather than donating it.

 

Parasitoids are organisms whose larval development occurs inside or on the surface of another organism, resulting in the death of the host. This means that the interaction between the parasitoid and the host is fundamentally different from that of a true parasite and shares some of the characteristics of predation.

An adelpho-parasite is a parasite in which the host species is closely related to the parasite, often being a member of the same family or genus. An example of this is the citrus black fly parasitoid, Encarsia perplexa, unmated females of which may lay haploid eggs in the fully developed larvae of their own species. These result in the production of male offspring. The marine worm Bonellia viridis has a similar reproductive strategy, although the larvae are plank tonic.

 

My opinion of you may be disgusting but, it is what it is.

 

 

 

4 Responses to “Classic Collision Atlanta is Owned by a Parasite #42”

  1. Exposed

    18. Aug, 2012

    They are not videos they are screen caps from a conversation where you did in fact specify that you where never raped. Turn your html on and you will see it.

    Your specific words where “the man never did force me against my will. The heartless asshole refused to help me with my medical bills, or loan me money. I needed those things.”

    http://i1050.photobucket.com/albums/s407/engridlirettexposed1/327da449.jpg

    Lets brush up on the definition of rape.
    Rape: forcing another person to have sexual intercourse

    So seeing as you where never actually forced to do anything(your words not mine) you where never actually raped. Which makes you no not a rape victim but a disgruntled gold digger who never got paid for her services.

  2. Exposed

    10. Aug, 2012